Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

Here are our top ten recommendations if you are looking for the best books to read in Travelogues & Travel Essays. We have made sure our list is diverse to cater to the interests of different types of readers.

1. Into the Wild


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

Krakauer’s page-turning bestseller explores a famed missing person mystery while unraveling the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons. "Terrifying... Eloquent... A heart-rending drama of human yearning." — New York Times In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How Christopher Johnson McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild . Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir. In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his cash. He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and, unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented. Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away. Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild. Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life. Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the drives and desires that propelled McCandless.  When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naiveté, pretensions, and hubris. He is said to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity, and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, Into the Wild is a tour de force. The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page.

  • Author: Jon Krakauer
  • Publisher: Anchor Books; 1st edition (February 1, 1997)
  • Genre: History, Americas
  • ISBN: 978-0385486804
  • Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.54 x 7.98 inches

                 

2. World Travel: An Irreverent Guide


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by writer, television host, and relentlessly curious traveler Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai to Tanzania’s utter beauty and the stunning desert solitude of Oman’s Empty Quarter—and many places beyond. In  World Travel , a life of experience is collected into an entertaining, practical, fun and frank travel guide that gives readers an introduction to some of his favorite places—in his own words. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay and, in some cases, what to avoid,  World Travel  provides essential context that will help readers further appreciate the reasons why Bourdain found a place enchanting and memorable. Supplementing Bourdain’s words are a handful of essays by friends, colleagues, and family that tell even deeper stories about a place, including sardonic accounts of traveling with Bourdain by his brother, Christopher; a guide to Chicago’s best cheap eats by legendary music producer Steve Albini, and more. Additionally, each chapter includes illustrations by Wesley Allsbrook. For veteran travelers, armchair enthusiasts, and those in between,  World Travel  offers a chance to experience the world like Anthony Bourdain.

  • Author: Anthony Bourdain
  • Publisher: Ecco; Illustrated edition (April 20, 2021)
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides
  • ISBN: 978-0062802798
  • Dimensions: 6 x 1.45 x 9 inches

                 

3. The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs: Use Outdoor Clues to Find Your Way, Predict the Weather, Locate Water, Track Animals―and Other Forgotten Skills (Natural Navigation)


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

Turn every walk into a game of detection—from master outdoorsman Tristan Gooley, New York Times -bestselling author of  The Secret World of Weather and The Natural Navigator When writer and navigator Tristan Gooley journeys outside, he sees a natural world filled with clues. The roots of a tree indicate the sun’s direction; the Big Dipper tells the time; a passing butterfly hints at the weather; a sand dune reveals prevailing wind; the scent of cinnamon suggests altitude; a budding flower points south. To help you understand nature as he does, Gooley shares more than 850 tips for forecasting, tracking, and more, gathered from decades spent walking the landscape around his home and around the world. Whether you’re walking in the country or city, along a coastline, or by night, this is the ultimate resource on what the land, sun, moon, stars, plants, animals, and clouds can reveal—if you only know how to look! Publisher’s Note: The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs was previously published in the UK under the title The Walker's Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs.

  • Author: Tristan Gooley
  • Publisher: The Experiment; Illustrated edition (July 31, 2015)
  • Genre: Science & Math, Astronomy & Space Science
  • ISBN: 978-1615192410
  • Dimensions: 5.4 x 1.2 x 8.2 inches

                 

4. Winds of the Steppe: Walking the Great Silk Road from Central Asia to China


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

Bernard Ollivier pushes onward in his attempt to become the first person to walk the entire length of the Great Silk Road.   “A gripping account. More than just a travel story—this is a quest for the Other.”—Alexis Liebaert , L’Événement   Picking up where  Walking to Samarkand  left off, Winds of the Steppe  continues the astonishing tale of journalist Bernard Ollivier’s 7,200-mile walk from Turkey to China along the Silk Road, the longest and most mythical trade route of all time.   Taking readers from the snows of the Pamir Mountains to the backstreets of Kashgar—a Central Asian city that could be the setting for One Thousand and One Nights —to the Tian Shan Mountains to the endless Taklamakan and Gobi Deserts of China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Bernard Ollivier continues his epic foot journey along the Great Silk Road hoping to make his way to Han China and reach, at long last, the legendary city of Xi’an.   After traveling through a region dotted with former Buddhist shrines, Ollivier finds himself craving the warm welcome of Islamic lands, where, regardless of their culture or nationality, travelers are often treated as esteemed guests. Beyond the occasional vestige of the old Silk Road, Ollivier comes face to face with sites of religious significance, China’s Great Wall, and of course thousands of everyday people along the way.   As Ollivier tries to make sense of his journey and find connections between these people’s daily lives and the so-called “modern” world, he does so with a sense of humility that transforms his personal journey into a universal quest.

  • Author: Bernard Ollivier
  • Publisher: Skyhorse (November 17, 2020)
  • Genre: Travel, Asia

                 

5. Tracks: One Woman's Journey Across 1,700 Miles of Australian Outback


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

The incredible true story of one woman’s solo adventure across the Australian outback, accompanied by her faithful dog and four unpredictable camels. I arrived in the Alice at five a.m. with a dog, six dollars and a small suitcase full of inappropriate clothes. . . . There are some moments in life that are like pivots around which your existence turns. For Robyn Davidson, one of these moments comes at age twenty-seven in Alice Springs, a dodgy town at the frontier of the vast Australian desert. Davidson is intent on walking the 1,700 miles of desolate landscape between Alice Springs and the Indian Ocean, a personal pilgrimage with her dog—and four camels. Tracks is the beautifully written, compelling true story of the author’s journey and the love/hate relationships she develops along the way: with the Red Centre of Australia; with aboriginal culture; with a handsome photographer; and especially with her lovable and cranky camels, Bub, Dookie, Goliath, and Zeleika.   Adapted into a critically acclaimed film starring Mia Wasikowska and Adam Driver, Tracks is an unforgettable story that proves that anything is possible. Perfect for fans of Cheryl Strayed’s Wild .

  • Author: Robyn Davidson
  • Publisher: Open Road Media (October 22, 2013)
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides

                 



6. Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

When Jon Krakauer reached the summit of Mt. Everest in the early afternoon of May 10, 1996, he hadn't slept in 57 hours and was reeling from the brain-altering effects of oxygen depletion. As he turned to begin his long, dangerous descent from 29,028 feet, 20 other climbers were still pushing doggedly toward the top. No one had noticed that the sky had begun to fill with clouds.  Six hours later and 3,000 feet lower, in 70-knot winds and blinding snow, Krakauer collapsed in his tent, freezing, hallucinating from exhaustion and hypoxia, but safe. The following morning, he learned that six of his fellow climbers hadn't made it back to their camp and were desperately struggling for their lives. When the storm finally passed, five of them would be dead, and the sixth so horribly frostbitten that his right hand would have to be amputated.  Into Thin Air is the definitive account of the deadliest season in the history of Everest by the acclaimed journalist and author of the best seller Into the Wild . On assignment for Outside Magazine to report on the growing commercialization of the mountain, Krakauer, an accomplished climber, went to the Himalayas as a client of Rob Hall, the most respected high-altitude guide in the world.   A rangy, 35-year-old New Zealander, Hall had summited Everest four times between 1990 and 1995 and had led 39 climbers to the top. Ascending the mountain in close proximity to Hall's team was a guided expedition led by Scott Fischer, a 40-year-old American with legendary strength and drive who had climbed the peak without supplemental oxygen in 1994. But neither Hall nor Fischer survived the rogue storm that struck in May 1996.  Krakauer examines what it is about Everest that has compelled so many people - including himself - to throw caution to the wind, ignore the concerns of loved ones, and willingly subject themselves to such risk, hardship, and expense.  Written with emotional clarity and supported by his unimpeachable reporting, Krakauer's eyewitness account of what happened on the roof of the world is a singular achievement. Into the Wild is available on audio, read by actor Campbell Scott.

  • Author: Jon Krakauer
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides, Writing, Travel

                 

7. Destinations of a Lifetime: 225 of the World's Most Amazing Places


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

NatGeo takes you on a photographic tour of the world's most spectacular destinations, inspiring tangible ideas for your next trip. Travel to hundreds of the most breathtaking locales-both natural and man-made-illustrated with vivid images taken by the organization's world-class photographers. These images, coupled with evocative text, feature a plethora of visual wonders: ancient monoliths, scenic islands, stunning artwork, electric cityscapes, white-sand seashores, rain forests, ancient cobbled streets, and both classic and innovative architecture. Loaded with hard service information for each location, Destinations of a Lifetime has it all: when to go, where to eat, where to stay, and what to do to ensure the most enriching and authentic experience.

  • Author: National Geographic
  • Publisher: National Geographic; Illustrated edition (October 27, 2015)
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides
  • ISBN: 978-1426215643
  • Dimensions: 9.48 x 1.1 x 12.27 inches

                 

8. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

Wild is a powerful, blazingly honest memoir: the story of an 1100-mile solo hike that broke down a young woman reeling from catastrophe - and built her back up again. At 22, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State - and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than “an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise.” But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone. Strayed faced down rattlesnakes and black bears, intense heat and record snowfalls, and both the beauty and loneliness of the trail. Told with great suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild vividly captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.

  • Author: Cheryl Strayed
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides, Writing, Travel

                 

9. A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail (Official Guides to the Appalachian Trail)


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

NEW YORK TIMES  BESTSELLER  •  The classic chronicle of a “terribly misguided and terribly funny” ( The Washington Post ) hike of the Appalachian Trail, from the author of  A Short History of Nearly Everything  and  The Body   “The best way of escaping into nature.”— The New York Times    Back in America after twenty years in Britain, Bill Bryson decided to reacquaint himself with his native country by walking the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Georgia to Maine. The AT offers an astonishing landscape of silent forests and sparkling lakes—and to a writer with the comic genius of Bill Bryson, it also provides endless opportunities to witness the majestic silliness of his fellow human beings.    For a start there’s the gloriously out-of-shape Stephen Katz, a buddy from Iowa along for the walk. But  A Walk in the Woods  is more than just a laugh-out-loud hike. Bryson’s acute eye is a wise witness to this beautiful but fragile trail, and as he tells its fascinating history, he makes a moving plea for the conservation of America’s last great wilderness. An adventure, a comedy, and a celebration,  A Walk in the Woods  is a modern classic of travel literature.   NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE

  • Author: Bill Bryson
  • Publisher: Crown; Reprint edition (May 4, 1999)
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides
  • ISBN: 978-0767902526
  • Dimensions: 5.26 x 0.76 x 7.92 inches

                 

10. Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India, and Indonesia


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Travelogues & Travel Essays - August 2021

This beautifully written, heartfelt memoir touched a nerve among both readers and reviewers. Elizabeth Gilbert tells how she made the difficult choice to leave behind all the trappings of modern American success (marriage, house in the country, career) and find, instead, what she truly wanted from life. Setting out for a year to study three different aspects of her nature amid three different cultures, Gilbert explored the art of pleasure in Italy and the art of devotion in India, and then a balance between the two on the Indonesian island of Bali. By turns rapturous and rueful, this wise and funny author (whom Booklist calls “Anne Lamott’s hip, yoga- practicing, footloose younger sister”) is poised to garner yet more adoring fans.

  • Author: Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Genre: Reference, Writing, Research & Publishing Guides, Writing, Travel