Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021



Here are our top ten recommendations if you are looking for the best books to read in Sociology. We have made sure our list is diverse to cater to the interests of different types of readers.

1. The 48 Laws of Power


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this multi-million-copy  New York Times  bestseller   is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control – from the author of The Laws of Human Nature. In the book that  People  magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum.   Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package,  The 48 Laws of Power  is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.

  • Author: Robert Greene
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; 1st edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Genre: Politics & Social Sciences, Politics & Government
  • ISBN: 978-0140280197
  • Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches

                 

2. The Truth About COVID-19: Exposing The Great Reset, Lockdowns, Vaccine Passports, and the New Normal


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

A Wall Street Journal and USA Today  national bestseller! Multiple New York Times best-selling author Dr. Joseph Mercola and Ronnie Cummins, founder and director of the Organic Consumers Association, team up to expose the truth―and end the madness―about COVID-19. Since early 2020, the world has experienced a series of catastrophic events―a global pandemic caused by what appears to be an engineered coronavirus; international lockdowns and border closings causing widespread business closures, economic collapse, and massive unemployment; and an unprecedented curtailment of civil liberties and freedoms in the name of keeping people safe by locking them up in their homes. We are now living in a world that is increasingly ruled, not by our democratic systems and institutions, but by public health fiat, carried out by politicians who rule by instilling fear and panic. In The Truth About COVID-19 , Dr. Mercola and Cummins reveal new and emerging evidence that: The SARS-CoV-2 virus was, indeed, lab-engineered and emerged from a negligently managed bioweapons lab in Wuhan, China The global pandemic was long anticipated by global elites who have used it to facilitate and hide the largest upward transfer of wealth in human history PCR testing, case counts, morbidity, and vaccine safety and efficacy data have been widely manipulated and misrepresented Obesity, diabetes, and heart disease are known to worsen COVID-19 outcomes, but the junk food industry continues to push its agenda at the expense of public health Safe, simple, and inexpensive treatment and prevention for COVID-19 have been censored and suppressed to create a clear path for vaccine acceptance Effectiveness of the vaccines has been wildly exaggerated and major safety questions have gone unanswered The good news in all of this is that we can take control of our health and that, together, we have the power to unite and fight back for our health, democracy, and freedom. The time is now for a global awakening. As Dr. Mercola and Cummins remind us, this is the fight of our lives.

  • Author: Doctor Joseph Mercola
  • Genre: Politics & Social Sciences, Politics & Government

                 

3. Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the number-one New York Times best seller Outliers , reinvents the audiobook in this immersive production of Talking to Strangers , a powerful examination of our interactions with people we don’t know.  How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true?  While tackling these questions, Malcolm Gladwell was not solely writing a book for the page. He was also producing for the ear. In the audiobook version of Talking to Strangers , you’ll hear the voices of people he interviewed - scientists, criminologists, military psychologists. Court transcripts are brought to life with re-enactments. You actually hear the contentious arrest of Sandra Bland by the side of the road in Texas. As Gladwell revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, and the suicide of Sylvia Plath, you hear directly from many of the players in these real-life tragedies. There’s even a theme song - Janelle Monae’s “Hell You Talmbout”.  Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.  The audiobook edition of Talking to Strangers was an instant number-one best seller, and was one of the most pre-ordered audiobooks in history. It seamlessly marries audiobooks and podcasts, creating a completely new and real listening experience.

  • Author: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Genre: Audible Books & Originals, Health & Wellness, Psychology & Mental Health, Psychology, Social Psychology & Interactions

                 

4. Caste (Oprah's Book Club): The Origins of Our Discontents


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

#1  NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLIST •  “An instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far.”—Dwight Garner,  The New York Times The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling author of  The Warmth of Other Suns  examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. NAMED THE #1 NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BY TIME,  ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People • The Washington Post • Publishers Weekly  AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine  • NPR • Bloomberg  • Christian Science Monitor • New York Post • The New York Public Library • Fortune •  Smithsonian Magazine •  Marie Claire • Town & Country • Slate  •  Library Journal • Kirkus Reviews • LibraryReads • PopMatters Winner of the  Los Angeles Times Book Prize • National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist • PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Finalist • PEN/Jean Stein Book Award Longlist “As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power—which groups have it and which do not.”   In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings.   Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people’s lives and behavior and the nation’s fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people—including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball’s Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others—she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing,  Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents  is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.

  • Author: Isabel Wilkerson
  • Publisher: Random House; Reprint edition (August 4, 2020)
  • Genre: History, Americas
  • ISBN: 978-0593230251
  • Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.2 x 9.6 inches

                 

5. Outliers: The Story of Success


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band. Brilliant and entertaining, Outliers is a landmark work that will simultaneously delight and illuminate.

  • Author: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books; 1st edition (June 1, 2011)
  • Genre: Business & Money, Management & Leadership
  • ISBN: 978-0316017930
  • Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches

                 



6. The Hero with a Thousand Faces: The Collected Works of Joseph Campbell


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

Since its release in 1949, The Hero with a Thousand Faces has influenced millions of readers by combining the insights of modern psychology with Joseph Campbell's revolutionary understanding of comparative mythology. In this book, Campbell outlines the Hero's Journey, a universal motif of adventure and transformation that runs through virtually all of the world's mythic traditions. He also explores the Cosmogonic Cycle, the mythic pattern of world creation and destruction. As relevant today as when it was first published, The Hero with a Thousand Faces continues to find new audiences in fields ranging from religion and anthropology to literature and film studies. The book has also profoundly influenced creative artists - including authors, songwriters, game designers, and filmmakers - and continues to inspire all those interested in the inherent human need to tell stories.

  • Author: Joseph Campbell
  • Genre: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Psychology & Counseling, Psychoanalysis

                 

7. It's OK That You're Not OK: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn't Understand


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

As seen in THE NEW YORK TIMES • READER'S DIGEST • SPIRITUALITY & HEALTH • HUFFPOST Featured on NPR's RADIO TIMES and WISCONSIN PUBLIC RADIO When a painful loss or life-shattering event upends your world, here is the first thing to know: there is nothing wrong with grief. "Grief is simply love in its most wild and painful form," says Megan Devine. "It is a natural and sane response to loss." So, why does our culture treat grief like a disease to be cured as quickly as possible? In It’s OK That You’re Not OK, Megan Devine offers a profound new approach to both the experience of grief and the way we try to help others who have endured tragedy. Having experienced grief from both sides―as both a therapist and as a woman who witnessed the accidental drowning of her beloved partner―Megan writes with deep insight about the unspoken truths of loss, love, and healing. She debunks the culturally prescribed goal of returning to a normal, "happy" life, replacing it with a far healthier middle path, one that invites us to build a life alongside grief rather than seeking to overcome it. In this compelling and heartful book, you’ll learn: • Why well-meaning advice, therapy, and spiritual wisdom so often end up making it harder for people in grief • How challenging the myths of grief―doing away with stages, timetables, and unrealistic ideals about how grief should unfold―allows us to accept grief as a mystery to be honored instead of a problem to solve • Practical guidance for managing stress, improving sleep, and decreasing anxiety without trying to "fix" your pain • How to help the people you love―with essays to teach us the best skills, checklists, and suggestions for supporting and comforting others through the grieving process Many people who have suffered a loss feel judged, dismissed, and misunderstood by a culture that wants to "solve" grief. Megan writes, "Grief no more needs a solution than love needs a solution." Through stories, research, life tips, and creative and mindfulness-based practices, she offers a unique guide through an experience we all must face―in our personal lives, in the lives of those we love, and in the wider world. It’s OK That You’re Not OK is a book for grieving people, those who love them, and all those seeking to love themselves―and each other―better.

  • Author: Megan Devine
  • Publisher: Sounds True, Inc.; 1st edition (October 1, 2017)
  • Genre: Self-Help, Death & Grief
  • ISBN: 978-1622039074
  • Dimensions: 5.33 x 0.78 x 8.03 inches

                 

8. White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

  • Author: Robin DiAngelo
  • Publisher: Beacon Press; Reprint edition (June 26, 2018)
  • Genre: History, Americas
  • ISBN: 978-0807047415
  • Dimensions: 6 x 0.57 x 9 inches

                 

9. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

New York Times Bestseller • Notable Book of the Year • Editors' Choice Selection One of Bill Gates’ “Amazing Books” of the Year One of Publishers Weekly ’s 10 Best Books of the Year Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction An NPR Best Book of the Year Winner of the Hillman Prize for Nonfiction Gold Winner • California Book Award (Nonfiction) Finalist • Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History) Finalist • Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize This “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide ( New York Times Book Review ).   Widely heralded as a “masterful” ( Washington Post ) and “essential” ( Slate ) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history ( Chicago Daily Observer ), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past. 13 illustrations

  • Author: Richard Rothstein
  • Publisher: Liveright; Reprint edition (May 1, 2018)
  • Genre: Politics & Social Sciences, Sociology
  • ISBN: 978-1631494536
  • Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.3 inches

                 

10. How to Be an Antiracist


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Sociology - August 2021

#1  NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • From the National Book Award–winning author of Stamped from the Beginning comes a “groundbreaking” ( Time ) approach to understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society—and in ourselves. “The most courageous book to date on the problem of race in the Western mind.”— The New York Times NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review •  Time • NPR •  The Washington Post •  Shelf Awareness  •  Library Journal • Publishers Weekly • Kirkus Reviews Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At its core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist , Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves. Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society. Praise for How to Be an Antiracist “Ibram X. Kendi’s new book,  How to Be an Antiracist , couldn’t come at a better time. . . . Kendi has gifted us with a book that is not only an essential instruction manual but also a memoir of the author’s own path from anti-black racism to anti-white racism and, finally, to antiracism. . . .   How to Be an Antiracist  gives us a clear and compelling way to approach, as Kendi puts it in his introduction, ‘the basic struggle we’re all in, the struggle to be fully human and to see that others are fully human.’ ” —NPR “Kendi dissects why in a society where so few people consider themselves to be racist the divisions and inequalities of racism remain so prevalent.  How to Be an Antiracist  punctures the myths of a post-racial America, examining what racism really is—and what we should do about it.” — Time

  • Author: Ibram X. Kendi
  • Publisher: One World; First Edition (August 13, 2019)
  • Genre: History, Americas
  • ISBN: 978-0525509288
  • Dimensions: 5.82 x 1.12 x 8.52 inches