Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021



Here are our top ten recommendations if you are looking for the best books to read in Archaeology. We have made sure our list is diverse to cater to the interests of different types of readers.

1. Fingerprints of the Gods


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

Could the story of mankind be far older than we have previously believed? Using tools as varied as archaeo-astronomy, geology, and computer analysis of ancient myths, Graham Hancock presents a compelling case to suggest that it is.   “A fancy piece of historical sleuthing . . . intriguing and entertaining and sturdy enough to give a long pause for thought.”— Kirkus Reviews   In  Fingerprints of the Gods,  Hancock embarks on a worldwide quest to put together all the pieces of the vast and fascinating jigsaw of mankind’s hidden past. In ancient monuments as far apart as Egypt’s Great Sphinx, the strange Andean ruins of Tihuanaco, and Mexico’s awe-inspiring Temples of the Sun and Moon, he reveals not only the clear fingerprints of an as-yet-unidentified civilization of remote antiquity, but also startling evidence of its vast sophistication, technological advancement, and evolved scientific knowledge.   A record-breaking number one bestseller in Britain,  Fingerprints of the Gods  contains the makings of an intellectual revolution, a dramatic and irreversible change in the way that we understand our past—and so our future.   And  Fingerprints of God  tells us something more. As we recover the truth about prehistory, and discover the real meaning of ancient myths and monuments, it becomes apparent that a warning has been handed down to us, a warning of terrible cataclysm that afflicts the Earth in great cycles at irregular intervals of time—a cataclysm that may be about to recur.   “Readers will hugely enjoy their quest in these pages of inspired storytelling.”— The Times  (UK)

  • Author: Graham Hancock
  • Publisher: Crown; Reissue edition (April 2, 1996)
  • Genre: History, Americas
  • ISBN: 978-0517887295
  • Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.6 x 9.2 inches

                 

2. The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

The #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, named one of the best books of the year by The Boston Globe and National Geographic: acclaimed journalist Douglas Preston takes readers on a true adventure deep into the Honduran rainforest in this riveting narrative about the discovery of a lost civilization -- culminating in a stunning medical mystery. Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the rainforest with hundreds of artifacts and an electrifying story of having found the Lost City of the Monkey God-but then committed suicide without revealing its location. Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest. In 2012 he climbed aboard a rickety, single-engine plane carrying the machine that would change everything: lidar, a highly advanced, classified technology that could map the terrain under the densest rainforest canopy. In an unexplored valley ringed by steep mountains, that flight revealed the unmistakable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing evidence of not just an undiscovered city but an enigmatic, lost civilization. Venturing into this raw, treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful wilderness to confirm the discovery, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. But it wasn't until they returned that tragedy struck: Preston and others found they had contracted in the ruins a horrifying, sometimes lethal-and incurable-disease. Suspenseful and shocking, filled with colorful history, hair-raising adventure, and dramatic twists of fortune, THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD is the absolutely true, eyewitness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.

  • Author: Douglas Preston
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (January 3, 2017)
  • Genre: Kindle Store, Kindle eBooks, History

                 

3. The Road to Eleusis: Unveiling the Secret of the Mysteries


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

The secretive Mysteries conducted at Eleusis in Greece for nearly two millennia have long puzzled scholars with strange accounts of initiates experiencing otherworldly journeys. In this groundbreaking work, three experts—a mycologist, a chemist, and a historian—argue persuasively that the sacred potion given to participants in the course of the ritual contained a psychoactive entheogen. The authors then expand the discussion to show that natural psychedelic agents have been used in spiritual rituals across history and cultures. Although controversial when first published in 1978, the book’s hypothesis has become more widely accepted in recent years, as knowledge of ethnobotany has deepened. The authors have played critical roles in the modern rediscovery of entheogens, and The Road to Eleusis presents an authoritative exposition of their views. The book’s themes of the universality of experiential religion, the suppression of that knowledge by exploitative forces, and the use of psychedelics to reconcile the human and natural worlds make it a fascinating and timely read. This 30th anniversary edition includes an appreciative preface by religious scholar Huston Smith and an updated exploration of the chemical evidence by Peter Webster.

  • Author: R. Gordon Wasson
  • Publisher: North Atlantic Books; 30th Anniversary ed. edition (November 25, 2008)
  • Genre: History, World
  • ISBN: 978-1556437526
  • Dimensions: 6 x 0.54 x 8.99 inches

                 

4. Atlantis: The Find of a Lifetime


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

Never before has there been a real discovery where all the physical characteristics of a proposed location matched Plato’s description of Atlantis. Not even the original Santorini hypothesis could sufficiently meet the given criteria. After years of extensive research, in conjunction with new archeological evidence, and with the aid of satellite technology, Christos A. Djonis credibly reveals that Plato based his story of Atlantis on a real prehistoric setting, now beneath 400 feet of water. We now have a real discovery where all the physical characteristics, along with Plato’s given chronology, flawlessly match, and they are precisely in the exact order as Plato depicted. Moreover, DNA and archaeological evidence of an advanced Neolithic civilization occupying the prehistoric submerged island, at around 9600 BC, further confirm a perfect case scenario. “Finally, a study that gives a logical and well-supported documentation for the existence of Plato’s Atlantis! I was totally enthralled with this exciting piece of history…” C.A Schultz, Schultz Studios

  • Author: Christos A. Djonis
  • Publisher: Page Publishing, Inc. (June 11, 2021)
  • Genre: Kindle Store, Kindle eBooks, Politics & Social Sciences

                 

5. 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed: Revised and Updated (Turning Points in Ancient History, 1)


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

A bold reassessment of what caused the Late Bronze Age collapse In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age―and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

  • Author: Eric H. Cline
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Revised, Updated edition (February 2, 2021)
  • Genre: History, Ancient Civilizations
  • ISBN: 978-0691208015
  • Dimensions: 5.25 x 0.8 x 8.05 inches

                 



6. The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

Pompeii is the most famous archaeological site in the world, visited by more than two million people each year. Yet it is also one of the most puzzling, with an intriguing and sometimes violent history.  Destroyed by Vesuvius in 79 CE, the ruins of Pompeii offer the best evidence we have of life in the Roman Empire. But the eruptions are only part of the story. In The Fires of Vesuvius , acclaimed historian Mary Beard makes sense of the remains. She explores what kind of town it was - more like Calcutta or the Costa del Sol? - and what it can tell us about "ordinary" life there. From sex to politics, food to religion, slavery to literacy, Beard offers us the big picture even as she takes us close enough to the past to smell the bad breath and see the intestinal tapeworms of the inhabitants of the lost city. She resurrects the Temple of Isis as a testament to ancient multiculturalism. At the Suburban Baths we go from communal bathing to hygiene to erotica.   Recently, Pompeii has been a focus of pleasure and loss: from Pink Floyd's memorable rock concert to Primo Levi's elegy on the victims. But Pompeii still does not give up its secrets quite as easily as it may seem. This book shows us how much more and less there is to Pompeii than a city frozen in time as it went about its business on 24 August 79 CE.

  • Author: Mary Beard
  • Genre: History, Ancient Civilizations, Rome

                 

7. A Pocket History of Human Evolution: How We Became Sapiens


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

Why aren’t we more like other apes? How did we win the evolutionary race? Find out how “wise” Homo sapiens really are. Prehistory has never been more exciting: New discoveries are overturning long-held theories left and right. Stone tools in Australia date back 65,000 years—a time when, we once thought, the first Sapiens had barely left Africa. DNA sequencing has unearthed a new hominid group—the Denisovans—and confirmed that crossbreeding with them (and Neanderthals) made Homo sapiens who we are today. A Pocket History of Human Evolution brings us up-to-date on the exploits of all our ancient relatives. Paleoanthropologist Silvana Condemi and science journalist François Savatier consider what accelerated our evolution: Was it tools, our “large” brains, language, empathy, or something else entirely? And why are we the sole survivors among many early bipedal humans? Their conclusions reveal the various ways ancient humans live on today—from gossip as modern “grooming” to our gendered division of labor—and what the future might hold for our strange and unique species.

  • Author: Silvana Condemi
  • Publisher: The Experiment (November 1, 2019)
  • Genre: Kindle Store, Kindle eBooks, Politics & Social Sciences

                 

8. The Knowledge of the Holy (General Press)


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

The Knowledge of the Holy' by A.W. Tozer illuminates God's attributes-from wisdom, to grace, to mercy-and in doing so, attempts to restore the majesty and wonder of God in the hearts and minds of all Christians. It teaches us how we can rejuvenate our prayer life, meditate more reverently, understand God more deeply and experience God's presence in our daily lives.

  • Author: A. W. Tozer
  • Publisher: General Press (May 24, 2019)
  • Genre: Christian Books & Bibles, Christian Living
  • ISBN: 978-9389157130
  • Dimensions: 5.25 x 0.32 x 8 inches

                 

9. The Talent Code: Greatness isn't born. It's grown


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

'Talent. You've either got it or you haven't.' Not true, actually. In The Talent Code , award-winning journalist Daniel Coyle draws on cutting-edge research to reveal that, far from being some abstract mystical power fixed at birth, ability really can be created and nurtured. In the process, he considers talent at work in venues as diverse as a music school in Dallas and a tennis academy near Moscow to demonstrate how the wiring of our brains can be transformed by the way we approach particular tasks. He explains what is really going on when apparently unremarkable people suddenly make a major leap forward. He reveals why some teaching methods are so much more effective than others. Above all, he shows how all of us can achieve our full potential if we set about training our brains in the right way.

  • Author: Daniel Coyle
  • Publisher: Random House Business; 1st edition (October 15, 2020)
  • Genre: Biographies & Memoirs, Professionals & Academics
  • ISBN: 978-1847943040
  • Dimensions: 5.08 x 0.63 x 7.8 inches

                 

10. Kindred: Neanderthal Life, Love, Death and Art (Bloomsbury Sigma)


Top 10 Best Books to Read in Archaeology - August 2021

" Kindred is important reading not just for anyone interested in these ancient cousins of ours, but also for anyone interested in humanity."-- The New York Times Book Review "A bold and magnificent attempt to resurrect our Neanderthal kin."-- The Wall Street Journal In Kindred , Neanderthal expert Rebecca Wragg Sykes shoves aside the cliché of the shivering ragged figure in an icy wasteland, and reveals the Neanderthal you don’t know, our ancestor who lived across vast and diverse tracts of Eurasia and survived through hundreds of thousands of years of massive climate change. This book sheds new light on where they lived, what they ate, and the increasingly complex Neanderthal culture that researchers have discovered. Since their discovery 150 years ago, Neanderthals have gone from the losers of the human family tree to A-list hominins. Our perception of the Neanderthal has changed dramatically, but despite growing scientific curiosity, popular culture fascination, and a wealth of coverage in the media and beyond are we getting the whole story? The reality of 21st century Neanderthals is complex and fascinating, yet remains virtually unknown and inaccessible outside the scientific literature. Based on the author’s first-hand experience at the cutting-edge of Palaeolithic research and theory, this easy-to-read but information-rich book lays out the first full picture we have of the Neanderthals, from amazing new discoveries changing our view of them forever, to the more enduring mysteries of how they lived and died, and the biggest question of them all: their relationship with modern humans.

  • Author: Rebecca Wragg Sykes
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Sigma (October 27, 2020)
  • Genre: Science & Math, Biological Sciences
  • ISBN: 978-1472937490
  • Dimensions: 6.61 x 1.42 x 9.54 inches